Choose a country:
Czechia
  • Austria
  • Belgium
  • Bulgaria
  • Switzerland
  • Cyprus
  • Czechia
  • Germany
  • Denmark
  • Estonia
  • Spain
  • Finland
  • France
  • United-Kingdom
  • Greece
  • Croatia
  • Hungary
  • Ireland
  • Iceland
  • Italy
  • Liechtenstein
  • Lithuania
  • Luxembourg
  • Latvia
  • Malta
  • Netherlands
  • Norway
  • Poland
  • Portugal
  • Romania
  • Sweden
  • Slovenia
  • Slovakia
  • Turkey

Last update:Aug 08, 2019

Item Status Links
National adaptation strategy
  • Adopted
National Adaptation Plan
  • Adopted
Impacts, vulnerability and adaptation assessments
  • Completed
Research programs
  • Completed
Meteorological observations
  • Established
Climate Projections and Services
  • Established
CC IVA portals and platforms
  • Established
  • Integrated Warning Service System
Monitoring, Indicators, Methodologies
  • Established
Monitoring Mechanism Regulation
  • Last reporting on Adaptation (Art. 15) submitted
National Communication to the UNFCCC
  • Last National Communication Submitted

The Strategy on Adaptation to Climate Change in the Czech Republic (hereinafter referred to as “Strategy”) was adopted by the Czech Government in October 2015 and is implemented by the National Action Plan on Adaptation to Climate Change (hereinafter referred to as “Action Plan”) since January 2017. Preparations of both the Strategy and the Action Plan were coordinated by the Ministry of the Environment in cooperation with a number of Ministries and relevant scientific institutions.

Adaptation Strategies

The Strategy, which is based on the relevant EU documentation, has been adjusted to specific conditions of the Czech Republic. The Strategy objective is to reduce anticipated climate change impacts, adapt to these impacts, and maintain good living conditions and to develop economic potential for the future generations. The Strategy presents observed climate change and defines the adaptation measures including their mutual linkages in connection to anticipated impacts of these changes. The priority sectors are forest management, agriculture, water regime in the landscape and water management, urban landscape, biodiversity and ecosystem services, health and hygiene, tourism and recreation, transportation, industry and energy sector, and emergency events and protection of the population and environment.

Adaptation strategies adopted at subnational levels

One regional and five adopted local adaptation strategies cover a population of 1,884,707, i.e. 18 % of the Czech population. The one regional level adaptation strategy is for the City of Prague and was adopted in 2017. Prague is both a municipality and a greater territorial self-governing unit (region) and the strategy addresses approximately 12 % of the country’s total population. It should also be noted that besides the development of an adaptation strategy, cities and towns often include adaptation considerations within their other strategic documents, such as development plans.

National adaptation plan

The Action Plan focuses on all major impacts of climate change in the Czech Republic: long-term droughts, floods and flash floods, extreme meteorological events (heavy rainfall, extremely high temperatures, extreme wind) and wild fires. The Action Plan elaborates further the measures outlined in the Strategy into specific tasks, which assign responsibilities, implementation deadlines, relevance of measures to individual climate change impacts and sources of financing. The document contains 33 specific objectives and 1 cross-cutting objective on Education, Training and Awareness raising. The individual specific objectives are fulfilled by 52 priority measures with 160 priority tasks. The number of measures and associated tasks reflect the broad intersectoral overlap between impacts of climate change and adaptation needs and the fact that the vast majority of measures (over 80 %) are already (in some sense) included in other strategic materials of national significance.

Sectoral adaptation plans

The Strategy for Environmental Safety 2016-2020 with an outlook to 2030 implements the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030. This strategy includes measures for disaster risk reduction connected with climate change impacts, notably extreme meteorological events. The Policy of Protection from Impacts of Drought and Water Scarcity was adopted by the Government in July 2017. The document describes the main adverse trends in climate and hydrological conditions in the last three decades, as well as future expected impacts of climate change on water balance. The document identifies strategic goals, such as increased knowledge of current and future drought and water scarcity risks, better preparedness based on operational plans and measures, increased public awareness, a balance between the availability of water resources and water demand across all sectors, and a restored natural water regime of the landscape. The effects of climate change are considered in the second river basin management plans (RBMP), when assessing the trends of water use up to the year 2021. The programme of measures contains a "Drought and water scarcity" measure, which addresses risks related to climate change. Flood risk management plans, as well as the Action Plan for Organic Farming 2016-2020, also take into account climate change issues. The Rural Development Programme 2014-2020 supports the implementation of adaptation measures within the agricultural sector.

Implementation means

In the Czech Republic, the Ministry of the Environment is the national coordinator for NAS development, adoption, implementation and evaluation. The Department of General Nature and Landscape Protection was responsible for the coordination and preparation of the document and the Department of Energy and Climate Protection was actively involved in the NAS preparatory phase, including consultations with the Czech Hydrometeorological Institute (CHMI).

There are already some sectoral action plans drafted that take climate adaptation into account, in particular in disaster risk reduction, water management and regional development planning. These plans have been adopted recently. During the NAP drafting process, existing and new adaptation actions were identified in order to ensure the continuity and improvement of adaptive capacity of the Czech Republic to future climate conditions. Implementation of the NAP is planned to be evaluated in 2019, as a basis for the preparation of an updated NAS. Relevant ministries are also responsible for their respective implementation tasks defined in the NAS as well as in the NAP.

Activities in the NAP that have already been implemented include measures for water retention in forests and promotion of restoration of the water management function of small water reservoirs. In addition, some measures undertaken by various Ministries and Departments in the agriculture, forestry, biodiversity, human health and water management sectors could also be considered relevant to climate adaptation. The RBMPs introduced support to the implementation of the adaptation measures identified in the National Programme to Abate the Climate Change Impacts in the Czech Republic (2004). Reportedly, the revision of the RBMPs takes due consideration of an increased frequency of floods and adds other flood risk management measures. For example, the context of climate change has been considered in the second RBMPs in order to assess the trends of water use up to the year 2021. The programme of measures contains a "Drought and water scarcity" measure, which is defining climate change risks.

Monitoring, reporting and evaluation

There is a system in place to monitor the implementation of the NAP on an annual basis. However, for the time being it is only used for internal purposes by the Ministry of the Environment. The overall monitoring of the NAP and the publication of its results will happen in 2019, since the NAP was adopted in 2017 and the NAS in 2015. The final evaluation of the NAP in 2019 will be one of the key inputs to the process of review and update of the NAS for the period after 2020. A set of indicators to measure vulnerabilities to climate change and adaptation will be tracked and evaluated.

According to the internal evaluation from 2018, out of 350 measures of the NAP, 65% are in the state “implemented/accomplished,” 17% in the state “partly implemented,” 17% in the state “not implemented,” 1% in the state “not implemented, behind schedule.” The largest portions of measures in the state “implemented/accomplished” were identified in the sectors of forestry (78%) and agriculture (75%). On the opposite side, there are the biodiversity and ecosystem services (36%) and urban landscape (54 %) sectors.

Schedule and planned review/revision

The NAS will be reviewed and updated in 2020. From then onwards, the NAS will be reviewed once every ten years. The NAP will be evaluated in 2019 and this evaluation will form the basis for the revision of the NAS. From then onwards, the NAP will be reviewed every 4-5 years, depending on the reporting obligations of the Czech Republic within the framework of its international commitments. The process of the revision and update of the NAS and NAP was initiated in 2018, with scheduled elaboration of the analytical part in July 2019 and the draft of the updated NAS in November 2019. Elaboration of the NAP is projected to be finished in April 2020. In December 2020 the NAS and NAP will be submitted to the government of the Czech Republic.

Priority sectors defined in the National Programme to Abate the Climate Change Impacts in the Czech Republic (2004) were water management, agriculture, forestry and health. These four areas remain important and were complemented by six new important areas (urban landscape, biodiversity and ecosystem services, tourism and recreation, transportation, industry and energy sector, and emergency events and protection of the population and environment) during the formulation of NAS, which was adopted in 2015.

Sectors addressed in NAS/NAP

As already mentioned, the priority sectors identified in the NAS are forest management, agriculture, water regime in the landscape and water management, urban landscape, biodiversity and ecosystem services, health and hygiene, tourism and recreation, transportation, industry and energy sector, and emergency events and protection of the population and environment. The selection of adaptation options in the NAS has been based on expert judgement. The prioritisation of adaptation measures proposed in the NAP per sector was made according to a robust multi-criteria analysis, in consultation with different ministries and thematic working groups. The priority was given to measures with positive impacts on climate adaptation and cross-cutting effects on sectors and on the overall economy.

The NAP measures were prioritised according to four criteria: (1) multiple adaptation effects to tackle the impacts of climate change, (2) cross-cutting social, economic or mitigation impacts, (3) impact on the environment and ecosystems, and (4) financial needs for implementation. Criterion (1) was evaluated by the thematic working groups and was attributed a value twice as important as criteria (2), (3) and (4). The latter were assessed by external consultants. Based on this multi-criteria analysis, adaptation measures were categorised into priority one measures and priority two measures.

Through the thematic working groups for the NAS and NAP development, inter-sectoral coordination between disaster risk management and climate adaptation has been established. Experts from the Safety and Crisis Management Department of the Ministry of the Environment who are responsible for disaster risk management have been involved in the preparation of the relevant NAS and NAP chapters. The Strategy of Environmental Safety 2016-2020 with an outlook to 2030, which implements the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030, has also been prepared by climate adaptation experts. The strategy includes measures for disaster risk reduction for disasters caused by climate change, mainly extreme meteorological events. The Policy of Protection from Impacts of Drought and Water Scarcity was adopted by the Government in July 2017. The document describes the main adverse trends in climate and hydrological conditions in the last three decades, as well as future expected impacts of climate change on water balance. The document identifies strategic goals, such as increased knowledge of current and future drought and water scarcity risks, better preparedness based on operational plans and measures, increased public awareness, a balance between the availability of water resources and water demand across all sectors, and a restored natural water regime of the landscape.

The effects of climate change are considered in the second river basin management plans (RBMP) when assessing the trends of water use up to the year 2021. The programme of measures contains a "Drought and water scarcity" measure, which addresses risks related to climate change. Due to the fact that the second RBMP was adopted whilst the NAS was being drafted, the NAS is not fully reflected in the second RBMP. The outcomes of the NAS and the NAP will be taken into account in the third RBMP.

Flood risk management plans, as well as the Action Plan for Organic Farming 2016-2020, also take into account climate change issues. The Rural Development Programme 2014-2020 supports the implementation of adaptation measures within the agricultural sector and the Operational Programme Environment 2014-2020 supports the implementation of adaptation measures in the landscape from the perspective of biodiversity and ecosystem services (i.e. within the sectors of water management, agriculture, forest management and urban landscape).

Both the NAS and the NAP identify existing and potential economic instruments to fund proposed adaptation measures. Besides the EU funds, there are several national programmes available for specific sectors, for instance the “Programme on landscape protection” and the “Programme for restoration of natural functions of landscape.” Both programmes have a high potential value for vulnerable sectors (agriculture, water management, forestry and biodiversity adaptation), as their actions might increase climate resilience. In addition, several programmes supporting the building and/or reconstruction of fish ponds, small water reservoirs, improvement of water courses, and support of the irrigation facilities are administrated by the Ministry of Agriculture, including a long-term programme for the prevention of floods.

Mainstreaming of adaptation

As the NAP was adopted in 2017, there is only limited evidence of adaptation being mainstreamed in sectoral policies up to date. However, there is progress in some sectors, i.e. biodiversity, agriculture, water management, disaster risk management and education. For example, restoration of water retention in the landscape (incl. small water reservoirs) is being implemented, river basin management plans include adaptation measures, and the State Programme for Environmental Education and Awareness Raising contains specific targets and measures focused on education and dissemination of information regarding climate adaptation. The NAS / NAP drive the integration of adaptation at sectoral level.

 

Development trends in climatological characteristics and the more frequent occurrence of extreme meteorological events and related environmental changes (e.g. bark beetle extension on the majority of national forests, extension of the pests) are already being reflected in changes in the water regime, agriculture and forestry, and the related insurance sector, and they also partially affect the state of the health of the population. In the medium term (the 2010–2039 period), it can be expected that there will be a further increase; especially harmful impacts are expected on the individual components of the natural environment, and it has been relatively recently pointed out that impacts are also anticipated in the energy sector, for recreation and tourism and on the overall well-being of the population, especially in larger residential agglomerations.

Observations and Projections

The Czech Hydrometeorological Institute (CHMI) provides information on actual weather conditions and alerts to extreme hydrological and meteorological situations. It also publishes data and information on climate change science, observations, scenarios and impacts. Regarding climate change impacts, a general qualitative description of impacts with some key figures from the modelling analysis is given. Monitoring of water courses done by the CHMI, based on specific indicators, provides different applicable data series showing the impacts of climate change. The CHMI functions as a state institute in the areas of air quality protection, hydrology, water quality, climatology and meteorology, with a competence to establish and operate the State monitoring and observation networks, including international data exchange pursuant to the WMO principles.

Regarding climate extremes, the warning system has been further improved on the basis of the innovated Integrated Warning Service System in the Czech Republic in cooperation between CHMI and the Fire Rescue System (Ministry of Interior). This system includes forecast warning information on 26 dangerous phenomena and each phenomenon is assigned a danger level (low, medium, extreme).

A large number of stations with an operative presentation of measured data and forecasts have been placed on the website of the reporting and forecasting flood service. Observations and collections of information on climate change and its impacts (i.e. drought) are also prepared by other institutions: the Committee on the Environment of the Czech Academy of Sciences and its institutes (mainly the Global Change Research Institute of the Czech Academy of Sciences – CzechGlobe), the National Forestry Committee, University departments and sectoral institutes.

Long-term drought monitoring and forecasts for a wide community of users including farmers, foresters, mass media, public institutions (e.g. for governmental payment of damages caused by drought to farmers) are coordinated by CzechGlobe. Information is published openly in the Czech and English languages on the website. Currently the indicators showing the effects of extreme weather events are developed for floods, such as Return Period of Floods and Flood Effects. Indicators for climate change impacts and extreme weather events, such as damages, casualties, and financial losses are currently being developed for the NAP.

Impacts and Vulnerability Assessment

A Comprehensive Study on Impacts, Vulnerability and Risk Sources Connected to Climate Change in the Czech Republic from November 2015 was conducted for the Ministry of the Environment. It provides an assessment of impacts and vulnerabilities to climate change adaptation in the Czech Republic at a general level as well as per adaptation-related sector. This assessment is mainly based on a study, Update of existing estimates of the impacts of climate change in the water, agriculture and forestry sectors, and proposed adaptation measures, completed by CHMI in 2011, analysing the results of a research project that developed scenarios and projections to assess the economic, social and environmental impacts of climate change. The assessment also includes information on indicators and a cost-benefit analysis.

Regarding revision and update of the NAS and the NAP, there will be an update of the study, conducted by the Czech Hydrometeorological Institute. The update will be finished in June 2019. The main model used for climate change scenarios to date in the Czech Republic is the ALADIN-CLIMATE/CZ regional climate model. The basis for the estimates of impacts is a specific project allowing for the integration of the regional climate model (RCM) ALADIN–CLIMATE/CZ with the A1B emissions scenario for 1961-2100 at a horizontal resolution of 25 km, completed by CHMI in 2011. The projections (which do not cover key uncertainties due to climate models or socioeconomic scenarios) have been used to screen the environmental impacts of climate change in specific sectors (water management, agriculture and forestry sectors) and to inform the initial identification of potential adaptation options. The assessment is being updated now.

The Comprehensive Study on Impacts mentioned above also has a section with an overview of the latest developments in this field, mentioning several recent projects carried out by a number of national institutions (e.g. CzechGlobe, Mendel University, Charles University) involved in modelling climate change impacts in the Czech Republic, and/or projects developing systems to monitor and share data on such impacts. An example is the CzechAdapt project (2015-2016) which developed a regularly updated online database to show the impacts of climate change, vulnerability assessments and adaptation measures for the Czech Republic based on the best available methods, e.g. GCM CMIP5 models and regional models coming from another project, EUROCORDEX – a coordinated downscaling programme. There are also a couple of regional projects, focusing on specific Czech regions and adaptation sectors: AdaptaN and UrbanAdapt.

For the time being, climate risks and vulnerability assessments within the frameworks of the NAS and NAP do not take transboundary risks into account. Nevertheless, this issue is partially covered through transboundary cooperation of the Czech Republic with the neighbouring states in the field of water management (transboundary water protection in the framework of the UNECE and in the international basins of Danube, Elbe and Oder rivers). However, it is yet to be defined how this transnational cooperation will address climate change, and how it will relate to the NAS and NAP.

Research

The Czech's research policy objective is to contribute to the understanding of the causes and effects of climate change factors, their sectoral, economic and social impacts, and to relevant international cooperation. The following institutions research the current state and development of the global and regional climate: Technology Agency of the Czech Republic, Environmental Committee of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, National Forestry Committee, Research institutes of Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, universities and other state research organizations, especially the CzechGlobe - Global Change Research Institute of the Czech Academy of Sciences (CAS).

Systematic observation of the climate system is undertaken in the required extent by the CHMI, acting as the responsible state body in air protection, hydrology, water quality, climatology and meteorology with competences to establish and manage state monitoring and observation networks according to WMO principles. In the Seventh National Communication of the Czech Republic (December 2017), 100 projects were described to take part in climate change research, focusing on the development of the state's climate, the evaluation of water management vulnerabilities, food security, etc. Among other activities, the CHMI establishes and operates national monitoring and observation systems that record the quantitative and qualitative states of the atmosphere and hydrosphere; processes the results, measurements and monitoring in compliance with EU legislation; creates and administers databases; and provides related information such as forecasts and alerts to dangerous hydro-meteorological events.

Further, the Ministry of the Environment, the Ministry of Agriculture and scientific organisations cooperate in defining research priorities and working on them. The NAS contains measures on how to improve the knowledge base on adaptation and research focus areas. Also, a list of institutions focusing on climate change adaptation research exists, some of them being part of the National Climate Programme that sets up research teams and publishes results. The NAP and NAS share research priorities, with the NAP mentioning that the National Policy on Research, Development and Innovation for 2016-2020 includes research in global changes, e.g., climate adaptation.

Some assessments of risks and vulnerabilities have been carried out through research projects with the most complex coordinated by the CHMI, called “Specification of existing estimates of climate change impacts in hydrology, water management, agriculture and forestry sectors and proposals for adaptation measures” (2011). The outcomes were used in the NAS' preparation. There are also several funding programmes indirectly linked to research gaps, e.g., the national programme ADAPT´s (2008-2016) main objective was the modernisation of the monitoring system to secure more accurate weather projections.

Monitoring progress

A set of indicators to measure vulnerabilities to climate change and adaptation in priority sectors has already been developed. Monitoring and the publication of the results based on these indicators will happen in June 2019 for data from the period 2014-2018. It will be the second publication of vulnerability indicators.

The national coordinator of the adaptation strategy’s development, implementation and evaluation is the Ministry of the Environment. The main stakeholders involved in the preparation of the NAS were relevant ministries and scientific and research institutions covering the sectors of biodiversity, forestry, agriculture, water, industry and energy, health and hygiene, crisis management, etc. Through the inter-ministerial consultations, stakeholders from regions and municipalities had the opportunity to participate in the preparation of the NAP.

Governance

In the Czech Republic, the Ministry of the Environment is the national coordinator for NAS development, adoption, implementation and evaluation. The Department of General Nature and Landscape Protection was responsible for the coordination and preparation of the document and the Department of Energy and Climate Protection was actively involved in the NAS preparatory phase, including consultations with the Czech Hydrometeorological Institute (CHMI). Monitoring and evaluation lies with the responsibility of the Department of Environmental Policy and Sustainable Development. The development of the NAS involved only the sectoral national ministries and the relevant scientific and research institutions, such as the Global Change Research Institute of the Czech Academy of Sciences (CzechGlobe) and Charles University Environment Centre. These stakeholders were also consulted on the final draft of the NAS, as well as business, non-governmental sectors, interest groups and other stakeholders within the adaptation platform and Committee for the landscape, water and biodiversity.

However, the Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) process of the NAS allowed the general public to provide written comments, and included a public hearing. Stakeholders also had the opportunity to participate directly on the preparation of the NAP via the inter-ministerial consultations and participation in thematic working groups. Several stakeholders provided written comments, including the Chamber of Commerce and Confederation of Employers and Business Union, Czech Geological Survey, Association of Municipal and Private Forest Owners, Forest Management Institute, Institute of Botany AS CR, The Water Supply and Sewerage Association of the Czech Republic, Green Circle (network of NGOs dealing with environmental issues), Chance for Buildings and others.

With regard to the coordination mechanism utilized during the implementation phase, an inter-ministerial working group on climate change issues was established in January 2015. This group cooperates, consults and works further on the basis of the NAS and was involved in the preparation process of the NAP. An adaptation platform was established in January 2016 within the framework of this working group and its preparation of the NAP. This platform continues to actively operate and is currently used for the purpose of the evaluation of the NAP.

The Ministry of the Environment is actively communicating with other relevant ministries and actors within the framework of the current evaluation of the NAP. The main goal of the communication strategy of the NAP is not only to ensure access to information but also to include the public and other stakeholders in the implementation of the NAS. In the future, the evaluation and monitoring of the NAS and adaptation measures set in the NAP will be secured through the inter-ministerial working group on climate change issues, which has also some members from non-governmental non-profit organisations.

Furthermore, the communication strategy aims to use two-way communication (bottom-up and top-down communication) between the Ministry of the Environment and the public, including the National Network of Local Action Groups in the Czech Republic, or the Union of the Towns and Municipalities of the Czech Republic. The inter-ministerial working group on climate change issues will be serving as the mediator for this communication. Activities in the NAP that have already been implemented include promotion of the restoration of the water management function of small water reservoirs. In addition, some measures undertaken by various Ministries and Departments in the agriculture, forestry, biodiversity, human health and water management sectors could also be considered relevant to climate adaptation.

Transboundary cooperation for climate adaptation was considered when drafting the NAS and NAP. The national experts from the Czech Republic and Slovenia organised meetings where they exchanged experiences and lessons learned from the preparation of the NAS and NAP. Furthermore, the Czech Republic has frameworks for bilateral cooperation with neighbouring countries, i.e., Germany (the Czech-German Commission on Environment and its working groups), Austria, Slovakia and Poland. There is close cooperation in the field of water management (e.g., transboundary early warning systems, flood prevention measures, etc., especially with Germany). The Czech Republic participates actively in the activities of the international commissions for the Elbe, Oder and Danube river basins. Transboundary projects are supported through Interreg EUROPE 2014-2020 (Bavaria, Saxony, Poland, Austria and Slovakia) in the fields of risk prevention, flood management systems and cooperation of rescue services.

Knowledge

The Ministry of the Environment publishes general and specific information on its website regarding climate adaptation, key documents and links to other relevant sources. CHMI publishes climate adaptation information on key climate impacts and scenarios in the in the Czech Republic. It also provides questions and answers, a glossary, the main international documents and other basic facts, besides the hydro-meteorological information.

A general communication strategy is part of the NAS and the NAP. The former specifies types of awareness-raising events related to the relevant sectors, targeted activities for media and the public. The NAS includes a general approach to environmental education and the legal basis for it (i.e., programmes for schools, awareness raising campaigns, exhibitions, etc.), which includes cooperation between the Ministry of the Environment and the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports. The NAS also defines the need to mainstream climate change adaptation into educational programmes and relevant strategic materials, and attributes the ministries responsible for doing so.

To improve capacity building in the field of climate adaptation, as announced in the NAS and NAP, a State Programme for Environmental Education and Awareness Raising for 2016-2025, adopted in 2016, incorporates climate change as a focal area. The State Programme for Environmental Education and Awareness Raising for 2016–2025 (SP EE and AR) is a key national strategy of the Czech Republic for the field of environmental education and eco-counselling (EE and EC), defining a structured vision, strategic areas, objectives and measures. Implementation involves not only state administrative authorities, but also regions, municipalities and schools, including universities, specialised facilities such as ecological education centres and eco-counselling organisations, and other entities established by the public administration, as well as private non-profit organisations, educational and research institutions, museums, zoos, botanical gardens, forestry institutions, libraries, church facilities, etc.

SP EE and AR constitutes methodological support for drawing up regional and municipal environmental education and eco-counselling concepts and evaluating the impact of all forms of such activities at all levels. One of the key topics of the SP EE and AR is “Climate in context.” The main goal is to address all important targeted groups to understand the causes of climate change and their negative effects and impacts on the Czech Republic, Europe and the world and the ability to learn and implement measures for both mitigation (reducing greenhouse gas emissions and especially moving away from fossil fuels) and adaptation (adapting to the negative impacts and consequences of climate change, especially reacting to extreme weather events).

Governmental institutions in the area of the environment participate in the environmental education of the general public – in addition to the Ministry of the Environment, also the Regional Authorities, Administrations of Protected Landscape Areas and National Parks, the Czech Environmental Information Agency (CENIA), the Nature Conservation Agency of the Czech Republic and other institutions. NGOs also play an important role. Greenpeace, the DUHA Movement, the Centre for transport and energy, the CZ Biom Association and others are systematically involved in climate change-related public debates, workshops or seminars.

International Dimension

The Czech Republic has, to date, five out of eleven signatories to the Covenant of Mayors for Climate & Energy (CoM) with respect to adaptation: Brno, Liberec, Litoměřice, Praha (signatory of Mayors Adapt) and Písek. In order to enhance coordination, the Ministry of the Environment of the Czech Republic became a national coordinator of the CoM in 2017.

The Visegrad group (V4) also addresses issues related to climate change adaptation in specific sectors (water management, nature protection, etc.) at a political level and within its working groups.

The Czech Republic is actively involved in the EU Strategy for the Danube Region and in the activities of its Priority Area 5, Environmental Risks, which, among others, addresses the challenges of water scarcity and droughts and focuses on the implementation of Danube wide flood risk management plans, taking into account the potential impacts of climate change as well.

The Czech Republic is a Party to the Framework Convention on the Protection and Sustainable Development of the Carpathians (Carpathian Convention). In 2014, the Fourth Meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Carpathian Convention adopted the Strategic Agenda on Adaptation to Climate Change in the Carpathian Region, which is being implemented mainly through the activities of the Working Group on Adaptation to Climate Change under the Convention. In October 2017, a new article (Article 12bis) on “Climate Change” was adopted at the Fifth Meeting of the Conference of the Parties. Within the macro-regional strategies, the Czech Republic is a member of European Meteorological Services Network (EUMETNET).

Ministry of the Environment of the Czech Republic

Deputy Director of the Department of Energy and Climate Protection

Katerina Sucha

Vrsovicka 1442/65, Praha 10, 100 10

Tel. +420 267122006

Mail katerina.sucha@mzp.cz

Website https://www.mzp.cz/en

[Disclaimer]
The information presented in these pages is based on the reporting according to the Monitoring Mechanism Regulation (Regulation (EU) No 525/2013) and updates by the EEA member countries