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Last update:May 03, 2019

Item Status Links
National Adaptation Strategy
  • Adopted
National Adaptation Plan
  • Adopted
  • Adopted
Impacts, vulnerability and adaptation assessments
  • Completed
  • Completed
  • Being developed
Research programs

 

 

Meteorological observations
  • Established
Climate Projections and Services
  • Established
CC IVA portals and platforms
  • Established
Monitoring, Indicators, Methodologies
  • Established
Monitoring Mechanism Regulation
  • Last reporting on Adaptation (Art. 15) submitted
National Communication to the UNFCCC
  • Last National Communication Submitted


 

The German Adaptation Strategy aims to reduce the vulnerability to climate change impacts, sustaining or enhancing the adaptive capacity of natural, societal and economic systems. In Germany, adaptation to climate change is a permanent task established along an agreed and politically adopted institutional and methodological framework. Scientific research programmes, participation and consultation processes as well as the establishment of ongoing reporting systems are set up. On the national level nearly all federal ministries are represented in the “Interministerial Working Group on Adaptation to Climate Change” (IWG Adaptation), lead by the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety. To coordinate adaptation activities with the federal states the Conference of Environmental Ministers established in June 2009 a standing committee for the adaptation to climate change impacts.


The Action plans of the German Adaptation Strategy are updated every five years together with “progress reports” and adopted by the Cabinet. The progress reports contain an updated action plan with concrete steps for the further development and implementation of the German Adaptation Strategy. The reports draw on findings and results from the Monitoring Report, Vulnerability Assessments, the Adaptation Action Plan and the Evaluation of the adaptation strategy. Together, they form a reporting system for the planning process for adaptation to climate change in Germany. The process can be divided into four phases based on the adaptation policy cycle.

KLiVO - Climate Preparedness-Portal
In September 2018 the German Climate Preparedness Portal / Deutsches Klimavorsorgeportal - KLiVO - was launched. KLiVO is the one governmental meta-information-platform that guides users to relevant and verified climate services. Users can self-define their individual needs, in terms of steps in the adaptation cycle, sector, region, climate hazard, user group.

 Adaptation Strategies

In 2015 the Federal Government of Germany adopted the first progress report of the DAS. This report gives an overview of the primarily federal activities since the adoption of the DAS in 2008 and the Adaptation Action Plan APA I (2011). The German Adaptation Strategy is updated every five years in the form of “progress reports” and adopted by the Cabinet. The progress reports present concrete steps for the further development and implementation of the German Adaptation Strategy. The reports draw on findings and results from the Monitoring Report, Vulnerability Assessments, the Adaptation Action Plan and the Evaluation of the adaptation strategy. Together, they form a reporting system for the planning process for adaptation to climate change in Germany.

Implementation means

The Adaptation Action Plans (APAs) specify the current and future measures on the federal level to adapt to climate change. Among other things, they are based on the scientific findings and results of the KWVA. The APAs thus describe the implementation of the German adaptation strategy through specific measures. They demonstrate links with other national processes. The implementation of the measures described in the APAs is in the responsibility of the relevant ministries.

Monitoring, reporting and evaluation

The monitoring report provides an overview of the observed impacts of climate change and the adaptation measures already introduced in Germany. This provides a compact overview of the changes that can already be observed as a result of climate change using measured data. The monitoring report will be updated every four years. The climate impact and vulnerability analysis (KWVA) will identify in which fields of action, which climate impacts and in which regions there are particular affected by climate change and where there are particularly strong needs for taking preventive action. The KWVA was developed for the first time in 2015. An update is planned every 6 years. The strategy process and the implementation of the adaptation strategy are evaluated every four years. The evaluation of the strategy is carried out according to a methodology adopted by the inter-ministerial working group on adaptation.

Schedule and planned review/Revision

The Action plans of the German Adaptation Strategy are updated every five years together with “progress reports” and adopted by the Cabinet.

Sectors addressed in NAS/NAP

The Strategy is sub-divided into 15 fields of action:

  • Building sector
  • Biological diversity
  • Soil
  • Energy industry
  • Financial services industry
  • Fishery
  • Forestry and forest management
  • Trade and industry
  • Agriculture
  • Human health
  • Tourism industry
  • Transport, transport infrastructure
  • Water regime, water management, coastal and marine protection
  • Spatial, regional and physical development planning
  • Civil protection

Vulnerability Assessment

The first vulnerability assessment of climate change impacts for selected fields of actions in Germany was conducted in 2005. Many studies have investigated this topic in recent years commissioned by different agencies. For the further development of the DAS and the prioritisation of climate risks and needs for action, an up-to-date, consistent cross-sectoral vulnerability assessment, covering the whole of Germany was prepared in 2011 until 2015.

In a screening procedure covering all of Germany using the newly-developed, consistent method, the regions and topics will be identified which are particularly at risk by climate change for each of the sectors and across these sectors. The results include climate change impact maps with a spatial resolution of municipalities. The vulnerability assessment was published by the end 2015.

The results were used for assessing the adaptation needs of the different sectors as basis for the Adaptation Action Plan (APA II).

Impact and Vulnerability Assessment

Overview of central challenges faced by Germany, classified according to thematic and regional vulnerability

Where?
Heat stress in conurbations Conurbations in areas that are already warm (will extend further)
Water use (in the distant future, summer drought) Regions with warm, dryer climates in eastern Germany and in the Rhine catchment area.
Heavy rain and flash floods: Damage to buildings and infrastructures Conurbations in the north-west German lowlands, central German highlands and south-west Germany.
River flooding: Damage to buildings and infrastructures Conurbations in river valleys of the north German lowlands, as well as the catchment areas of the Rhine and Danube.
Coastal damage: (Becoming more pronounced in the distant future) - rising sea levels, more rough seas, and growing threat of storm surge Coastal regions.
Modified species and natural development phases Seas and rural regions.

 

 

 

Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, Building and Nuclear Safety, BMU

Susanne Hempen

Manager German Strategy for Adaptation to Climate Change

Mail Susanne.Hempen@bmu.bund.de 

Website https://www.bmu.de/ 

[Disclaimer]
The information presented in these pages is based on the reporting according to the Monitoring Mechanism Regulation (Regulation (EU) No 525/2013) and updates by the EEA member countries