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Last update:Aug 08, 2019

Item Status Links
National Adaptation Strategy
  • Adopted
National Adaptation Plan
  • Adopted

Impacts, vulnerability and adaptation assessments

  • Completed

 

 

  • Ongoing
Research programs
  • Completed
     
  • Currently being undertaken
Meteorological observations
  • Established
Climate projections and services
  • Established
CC IVA portals and platforms
  • Established
Monitoring, indicators, methodologies
  • Currently being undertaken
Monitoring Mechanism Regulation
  • Last reporting on Adaptation (Art. 15) submitted
National Communication to the UNFCCC
  • Last National Communication Submitted

 

The Dutch adaptation policy comprises two parts: the National Climate Adaptation Strategy and the Delta Programme. The National Climate Adaptation Strategy is an overarching strategy of the national government. It addresses all possible impacts of climate change. The Delta Programme is a programme set up by all governmental levels in close cooperation, which addresses a large part of the possible impacts of climate change to the Netherlands: sea level rise, intense rainfall over long periods, intense rainfall over short periods (cloudbursts), droughts and heat.

Adaptation Strategies

The first National Climate Adaptation Strategy (NAS) stems from 2007. The second NAS was adopted by the Council of Ministers in 2016. The NAS is a strategy of the State government. Also authorities from provinces, district water boards and municipalities, knowledge institutes, private sector companies and societal organizations were consulted. The Delta Programme is a programme which addresses a large part of the possible impacts of climate change to the Netherlands: sea level rise, intense rainfall over long periods, intense rainfall over short periods (cloudbursts), droughts and heat. Within the Delta Programme three generic topics (flood risk management, freshwater supply and spatial adaptation) and eight regions are distinguished. The Delta Programme started in 2010. All governmental layers of the Netherlands are directly involved and have collaborating closely together: national government, provinces, district water boards and municipalities. All these parties have committed to the pursuit of the collective national goals and the implementation of the Delta Programme, based on their own responsibilities. The businesses, security (or safety) regions, research institutes, and NGO’s are also involved and provide input. Overall control is exercised by the Delta Programme Commissioner, under the political responsibility of the coordinating Minister, the Minister of Infrastructure and Water Management. Each year a new version of the Delta Programme is published and sent to the House of Representatives as part of the annual Budget of the Ministry of Infrastructure and Water Management. The Delta Programme is built on a legal framework referred to as ‘the Delta Act on flood safety and freshwater supply' (hereafter: the Delta Act). The Delta Act anchors the Delta Programme, the Delta Fund and the role of the Delta Commissioner. The Delta Act entered into force on 1 January 2012. Adaptation action plans In 2018 the Dutch Council of Ministers adopted the Implementation Programme 2018-2019 of the National Adaptation Strategy (NAS). Its focus is on raising awareness and on involving parties that are currently not yet (sufficiently) involved. It identified six priorities:

  1. heat stress,
  2. infrastructure,
  3. agriculture,
  4. nature,
  5. built environment and
  6. collaborating on provincial and regional strategies and visions.

The annual Delta Programme, which is developed by the Delta Commissioner and sent by the Minister of Infrastructure and Water Management to Parliament, includes three Delta Plans and the Delta Fund budget. For each topic within the Delta Programme there is a specific adaptation action plan:

  • Delta Plan on Flood Risk Management,
  • Delta Plan on Freshwater Supply and
  • Delta Plan on Spatial Adaptation.

The Delta Plan on Flood Risk Management comprises all the Delta Programme studies, measures and provisions, scheduled or to be scheduled, pertaining to flood risk management. The measures are funded from the Delta Fund, and, in some cases, from the Ministry of Infrastructure and Water Management budget. Where appropriate, the Delta Plan on Flood Risk Management also features regional measures not subsidised by the central government.

The Delta Plan on Fresh Water Supply comprises all the measures, studies, and knowledge issues relating to a sustainable freshwater supply that have been scheduled, and that are funded – in whole or in part – from the Delta Fund.

The Delta Plan on Spatial Adaptation comprises the measures aimed at rendering the Netherlands climate proof and water-resilient, with a focus on seven ambitions:

  1. Mapping out vulnerability,
  2. Conducting risk dialogues and drawing up strategies,
  3. Drawing up implementation agendas,
  4. Capitalising on linkage opportunities,
  5. Promotion and facilitation,
  6. Regulating and embedding,
  7. Responding to calamities.

Implementation means

The NAS Implementation Programme 2018-2019 does not specify which actions will be taken up by which party, nor which budget is allocated. The annually updated Delta Programme contains three Delta Plans (flood risk management, fresh water supply and spatial adaptation), in which for a period covering several years is specified which measure is going to be taken by which party and what budget is allocated.

Monitoring, reporting and evaluation

The Delta Programme monitors, reports and evaluates the Delta decisions and the preferential strategies and the actions addressed in its three Delta Plans. The Delta Act (2012) was independently evaluated in 2016. An evaluation of the five Delta Decisions and the preferential strategies (2014) is foreseen to be published in 2020.

Schedule and planned review/revision

The National Climate Adaptation Strategy 2016 (NAS) does not specifically mention when the NAS will be reviewed or updated. In the Implementation Programme 2018-2019 of the NAS it is mentioned that ‘The implementation of the NAS will be evaluated towards the end of 2019. A review will then be conducted to determine if the ambitions and actions require adjustment, and a decision will be taken on a possible follow-up Implementation Programme’. Each year the Delta Programme is reviewed, revised, updated and finally published. This includes the Delta Fund and the three Delta Plans (adaptation action plans). The Delta Programme 2015 contained five Delta Decisions and preferential strategies for each of the topics and regions. Each year the Delta Programme reports on the implementation of these decisions and strategies. It is foreseen that in the Delta Programme 2021 (due in September 2020) the evaluations of these five Delta Decisions and the preferential strategies will be published.

The Dutch adaptation policy comprises two parts: the National Climate Adaptation Strategy and the Delta Programme.

Sectors addressed in NAS/NAP

Disaster risk reduction

In the field of Disaster Risk Reduction specific attention is paid to climate adaptation. Within the framework of the Delta Programme (Spatial Adaptation) already since 2014 special attention is paid to the protection of vital and vulnerable functions of national importance to the present and future risk of flooding. Sectors addressed in this ‘Vital and vulnerable’ programme are energy (electricity, gas, oil), telecom, transport, chemical industry, nuclear industry, Genetically Modified Organisms, health (hospitals), water management & flood protection, waste water treatment plants, drinking water production. Recently more attention is paid to the protection of vital and vulnerable functions at regional and local level, including other future impacts than floods, such as heat stress, drought and excessive rainfall. This is part of the stress tests and risk dialogues to be conducted by all municipalities, district water boards and provinces before the end of 2020.

Agriculture

The Minister of Agriculture, Nature Conservation and Food Security intends to publish an agricultural climate action plan in 2019.

Nature

The Minister of Agriculture, Nature Conservation and Food Security intends to publish a nature climate action plan in 2019.

Public health

The Minister of Health, Welfare and Sport is developing a climate heath agenda. For health the National heat wave plan is operational.

Environment

A new Environment Act encompasses all fields in relation to physical activities, including economic development, transport, nature, cultural heritage, environmental quality, water management, spatial planning etc. This Environment Act is entering into force in 2021. This Act prescribes the development of Environmental Visions on national, provincial and local level. One of the strategic assignments for the development of these Environmental Visions is climate adaptation. In 2017 the first part of the ‘Nationale Omgevingsvisie’ has been published, which addresses also the issue of climate change and more specific climate adaptation. Part of the existing spatial planning legislation, which is also part of the new Environment Act, is the Water Assessment (watertoets), in which water authorities assess the impacts of spatial plans on the water system, and have the task to advice the planning authorities about the spatial plans with regard to the expected impact of the new plan on the water system (including future changes due to climate change).

Infrastructure

Roads, waterways and watersystems Rijkswaterstaat, an agency responsible for the management of state highways and water ways, rivers, lakes and the North Sea is the executive part of the Ministry of Infrastructure and Water Management. Rijkswaterstaat is developing a working programme for climate resilient networks: roads, waterways and water systems. Rijkswaterstaat has made a vulnerability assessment for the priority sector road transport. For the road sector areas vulnerable to flooding, so called ‘blue spots’ have been investigated, followed by the investigation of the vulnerability of road constructions like embankments and critical road infrastructure elements. On the networks of Rijkswaterstaat knowledge on how to adapt to climate change is exchanged within the organisation, with the rail sector (Prorail) and with colleagues in other European Countries and the United States, for example by implementing tools in projects. Within the programme for climate resilient networks capacity building is part of the programme.

Mainstreaming of adaptation

In the Delta Plan Spatial Adaptation it is stated that the national government, all provinces, all district water boards and all municipalities will have drawn up implementation and investment agendas for their regions, based on the adaptation strategy no later than 2020. All these parties will subsequentely embed their contributions in policy and regulations. Risk of flooding and extreme weather events are part of compulsory risk management method for network operators for electricity, natural gas and telecom/ICT.

 

The Dutch adaptation policy comprises two parts: the National Climate Adaptation Strategy and the Delta Programme

Observations and Projections

National observation programmes and systems to support the monitoring of climate change and its impact. The Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI) gathers information about the atmosphere and the subsurface. Its primary tasks are weather forecasting and monitoring of weather, climate, air quality and seismic activity. It provides observations on atmospheric, oceanic and terrestrial indicators and this includes data on extreme weather. Therefore the KNMI monitors extreme climate events. They maintain long time series on among others, temperature and precipitation extremes (incl. hail), and the frequency and intensity of storms. The results of the monitoring of the impacts of extreme climate events are distributed across multiple stakeholders in different sectors. In principle the indicators can be grouped into three main categories: economic damage, damage to the environment (including nature) and to human society (including casualties). The national agency Rijkswaterstaat is responsible for measuring all kind of parameters with regard to the North Sea, coastal waters and the main rivers, including the water levels along the coast and in the main rivers.

National reference climate projections and scenarios in support of vulnerability assessments for adaptation policymaking

The available climate models in the Netherlands developed by the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI) are quite elaborate, especially from a geographical point of view. The Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI) provides climate scenarios for the future climate change in the Netherlands. The most recent scenarios are the KNMI’14 scenarios. They are based on the fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the IPCC. The KNMI’14 contains four scenarios for future climate change around 2050 and 2080. The four KNMI scenarios differ in the amount of global warming (Moderate or Warm) or possible changes in the air circulation pattern (Low or High). The four scenarios provide the changes of 12 climate variables, including temperature, precipitation and sea level. A summary, a brochure and the scientific report of the KNMI’14 climate scenarios. A new set of climate scenario’s for the Netherlands and related products will be published in 2021, aligned with the sixth assessment Report (AR6) of the IPCC in order to deliver state-of-the-art climate information. The Delta Programme make use of Delta Scenarios , which are plausible views of future climatic and socio-economic trends, looking ahead to 2050 and 2100. The Delta Scenarios are based on the KNMI climate scenarios and the socio-economic scenarios of CPB Netherlands Central Planning Agency and the PBL Netherlands Environmental Agency. In the latter the potential impact of socio-economic trends on the use of land, water, and space up to 2050 are considered. The Delta Scenarios have been actualised several times, for the last time in 2017.

National climate services associated with national observations and projections

The Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI) provides a National database with Observation with regard to Climate Change. This includes an overview of national observations about temperature, precipitation, sea level, wind and storm, hail and thunder, clouds and solar radiation, evaporation and drought. These national observations are compared with the observations of the IPCC. The Climate Impact Atlas provides an initial impression of the (future) threats of flooding, waterlogging, drought and heat. It has a zoom function, and includes several indicators for each threat. Several map layers are available for each of the topics. The Atlas is based on national data, and is among others connected to the KNMI’14-scenarios. Use of the atlas is free. The State government, provinces, district water boards and municipalities have agreed upon executing a standardised stress test in the Delta Plan Spatial Adaptation. Each governmental body will investigate for its area the possible future consequences of four climate threats: water logging, heat, flooding and drought. The outcome of this stress test needs to be finished in 2019. In the stress test there is a focus on vital and vulnerable functions. The Delta Programme Spatial Adaptation has developed a guidance for performing the test, including standards for the change of impacts of climate change, and guidance for the interpretation of the results of the test. The next step after the stress test is to organise a Risk Dialogue with all stakeholders to evaluate the outcome of the risk analysis and to see which measures needs to be taken.

Impact and Vulnerability Assessment

Vital and vulnerable functions

Already in 2008 it was recognised in the National Risk Assessment that extreme weather events and flooding pose a serious threat to vital interests of the Netherlands and the prevention of societal disruption. Since then several report have been published on the vulnerability of vital infrastructure to flooding, water logging, drought and heat at the national level. Of the 12 vital sectors identified at national level, seven of these sectors turned out to specifically sensitive to the impacts of climate change: flooding, water logging, drought and heat. As part of the Delta Programme the Ministry of Infrastructure and Water Management started to initiate and monitor actions for these seven sectors with vulnerable infrastructures: These sectors are energy, telecom/ICT, drinking water & waste water treatment, health institutes, transport, chemical and nuclear facilities . The Approach of Vital and Vulnerable Functions within the Delta Programme started identified thirteen national vital and vulnerable functions, divided over these seven vital sectors. Each year an progress report is published as Annex to the annual Delta Programme.

PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency has assessed the impact of climate change to the Netherlands in the report ‘The effects of climate change in the Netherlands: 2012’. In 2013 PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency in collaboration with the KNMI published the report ‘Adaptation with caution, building blocks for an integrated vision on climate adaptation’. In 2014 seven sectoral assessments of risks and vulnerability to climate change were published for transport infrastructure, energy infrastructure, ICT, health, nature, agriculture and fisheries & aquaculture. In 2015 an extensive risk analysis of the impact of climate change to The Netherlands was published by PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency in collaboration with KNMI and Deltares: "Adaptation to climate change in the Netherlands – Studying related risks and opportunities".

In 2017 the Bank of the Netherlands published an analysis of the risks of climate change for the Dutch financial sector. It looked at the implications for supervisors, market parties and policy makers.

Transboundary evaluations Worldwide

In 2015 PBL Netherlands Environmental Agency published the study ‘Worldwide climate effects in the Netherlands’ . It concluded that on a global scale the most important climate risks for the Netherlands are related to disruptions to economic chains and the possibility of political tension. In Europe, the climate risks with the greatest impact are related to the international power grid and the ICT networks. A related study ‘Implications for Dutch foreign policy of international climate change effects’ of Netherlands Institute of International Relations ‘Clingendael’ was published also in 2015.

Benelux

There is a the trilateral cooperation between Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg in the Benelux. In the period 2015-2016 the General Secretariat of the Benelux, in consultation with the Working Group on Climate Adaptation and other Benelux working groups, organised four exploratory workshops on Climate Adaptation in relation to 'Energy', 'Transport & Mobility', 'Public Health in combination with Urban Policy' and 'Risk management'. An additional workshop took place with other regional groupings on climate adaptation in Europe.

River Basins

There is a long history of cooperation between the countries of the river basins of each of the four large rivers flowing through the Netherlands: the Rhine, the Meuse, the Scheldt and the Ems. For each river basis there exists an international river commission. Water quality, water quantity, flood protection and ecology are on the agenda of these commissions, giving among others international coordination between the Member States to the implementation of the EU Water Framework Directive and the Flood Directive. The International Commission for the Protection of the Rhine (ICPR) published an strategy for the Rhine for adapting to climate change in 2015.

Wadden Sea

In the trilateral Wadden Sea cooperation Denmark, Germany and the Netherlands work together to protect the Wadden Sea as an ecological unity. Climate change, including enhanced sea level rise may seriously impact the structure, functions and biodiversity of the Wadden Sea ecosystem, as well as the safety of its inhabitants. In 2014 at the 12th Wadden Sea Conference a trilateral strategy on increasing the resilience of the Wadden Sea to the impacts of climate change was adopted . In 2017 the ‘Trilateral Wadden Sea Climate Change Adaptation Strategy Monitoring Report’ was published.

Research

Right from the start of the Delta Programme in 2010 addressing adaptation knowledge priorities plays an important role. On a regular basis, a Knowledge Agenda is published. The last Delta Programme Knowledge Agenda dates from September 2018, as Annex to the Delta Programme 2019. The knowledge issues constitute input for the knowledge programmes of the Ministry of Infrastructure and Water Management, Rijkswaterstaat, the provinces, the Foundation for Applied Water Research STOWA, the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute KNMI, Deltares research institute, and universities. A part of these knowledge issues are addressed under the National Water and Climate Knowledge and Innovation Programme (NKWK), which has been operational since 2015. In this national programme government authorities, knowledge institutes and companies work in conjunction on pilot projects, topical issues and long-term developments in fourteen different research tracks.

Institutions:

  • Ministry of Infrastructure and Water Management, DG Water Management and Soil
  • Ministry of Infrastructure and Water Management, DG Rijkswaterstaat
  • Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI)
  • Netherlands Environmental Agency (PBL)
  • The Foundation for Applied Water Research STOWA
  • The Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO)
  • Deltares
  • The Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research (TNO)
  • Alterra
  • National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM)

Universities:

  • Wageningen University & Research,
  • Technical University of Delft,
  • University of Utrecht, University of Twente, University of Groningen)
  • KWR Water
  • Netherlands Institute for the Research of the Seas (NIOZ)
  • Climate KIC Benelux

Three processes can be distinguished:

  • the National Water and Climate Knowledge and Innovation Programme (NKWK)
  • Top sector Water and Maritime
  • Netherlands Consortium on Climate Change Adaptation (CCCA)

Monitoring progress

In the Implementation Programme 2018-2019 of the National Climate Adaptation Strategy (2018) reference is made to an Action Plan for NAS Monitoring which was drawn up in 2017. In this plan, the monitoring ambitions are elaborated into four specific objectives:

  • Monitoring the progress of the implementation programme;
  • Monitoring the extent to which climate adaptation measures are effective in terms of risk reduction;
  • Monitoring the development of climate change risks to all sectors;
  • Setting up a ‘digital workspace’ on the website ‘Spatial Adaptation’.

The NAS programme team will develop indicators for sectors and climate impacts that are not addressed by the Delta Programme. The Netherlands Environmental Agency (PBL) published a preliminary design for monitoring of adaptation in 2015. The Delta Programme uses the monitoring programme ‘Monitoring, Analysing, Acting’ . This system focuses on four key questions:

  • Is the implementation on schedule and within budget? (output)
  • Are we on the right track? Are we gaining our goals? (outcome)
  • Are we addressing the tasks in an integrated manner?
  • Participation: are other parties (authorities, companies, NGO’s and citizens) participating on a wide scale, wherever necessary?

A Signal Group has been installed, to monitor developments that could be relevant to the steering course of the Delta Programme. This group has selected eight indicators to enable the timely and reliable identification of any needs for adjustment of the Preferential Strategies, which are open to annual adjustment. In addition, the Delta Decisions and Preferential Strategies will be subjected to a systematic review every six years. The result of the first six-year review will be presented in Delta Programme 2021. The most recent overview of the status of the implementation of monitoring and review systems for the adaptation process can be found in paragraph 2.1 of the Delta Programme 2019 publication.

 

The Dutch adaptation policy comprises two parts:

  • the National Climate Adaptation Strategy
  • the Delta Programme

Governance

The Ministry of Infrastructure and Water Management is the responsible ministry for the coordination of the development, implementation and monitoring of the National Climate Adaptation Strategy and the Implementation Programme 2018-2019. The Ministry of Infrastructure and Water Management is also the responsible ministry for the development, implementation and monitoring of the Delta Programme. The Council of Ministers have installed a Delta Commissioner with the task to development, implement and monitor the yearly updated Delta Programme. The Delta Commissioner needs to report to the Minister of Infrastructure and Water Management. A central role in the coordination of the National Adaptation Strategy and its Implementation Programme is played the Coordination Group at the level of directors of the different ministries. Also representatives from the Association of Provinces of the Netherlands (IPO), the Association of Netherlands Municipalities (VNG) and the Association of Regional Water Authorities (UvW) participate. The Delta Programme is a programme in which the national government, provinces, district water boards and municipalities in the Netherlands work closely together. Delta Programme distinguishes eleven sub-programmes: eight regions and three generic topics , reflection the close relationship with the regional elaboration of the programme. Each year the Delta Programme is updated by the Delta Commissioner. This updated programme is sent to the Dutch Parliament by the Minister of Infrastructure and Water Management. A specific characteristic of the Delta Programme is that the horizontal and vertical coordination is fully integrated. A central role in the coordination of the Delta Programme is played by the national Delta Programme Steering Group. Each sub-programme has a Steering Group with representatives from all governmental layers (state, provinces, district water boards, municipalities), also responsible for consultations of groups of citizens, companies and ngo’s. The Ministry of Justice and Security is responsible for Disaster Risk Management and the mainstreaming of adaptation to climate change in the national disaster risk policies. The horizontal coordination takes place in the National Security Steering Group, which is the ex officio decision making level on the policies of the approach of the Dutch central government on vital critical infrastructure. The horizontal and vertical coordination in the field of disaster risk management giving the threats of among others flooding, water logging and fires, is organised in the Dutch Security Regions. The Environmental Consultation Committee (OFL) is an independent platform, which offers opportunities for collaboration between state government and companies, groups of citizens and NGO’s. Each year the OFL organizes both a formal and an informal meeting about the Delta Programme.

Knowledge

Right from the start of the Delta Programme in 2010 addressing adaptation knowledge priorities plays an important role. On a regular basis, a Knowledge Agenda is published. The last Delta Programme Knowledge Agenda dates from September 2018, as Annex to the Delta Programme 2019. The knowledge issues constitute input for the knowledge programmes of the Ministry of Infrastructure and Water Management, Rijkswaterstaat, the provinces, the Foundation for Applied Water Research STOWA, the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute KNMI, Deltares research institute, and universities. A part of these knowledge issues are addressed under the National Water and Climate Knowledge and Innovation Programme (NKWK). The National Water and Climate Knowledge and Innovation Programme (NKWK) has been operational since 2015. In this national programme government authorities, knowledge institutes and companies work in conjunction on pilot projects, topical issues and long-term developments. As part of the Deltaprogramme Spatial Adaptation the Ministry of Infrastructure and Water Management is supporting the process of developing new projects for climate adaptation. For this goal there is 20 million Euro available, for:

  • Support of the processes of decentral governments in executing stress tests and organising risk dialogues and developing action plans,
  • Pilots of projects and financial incentives for climate adaptation,
  • Knowledge development and sharing knowledge.

There is a number of handbooks and guidelines for climate adaptation, which can be found on the portal Spatial Adaptation. All handbooks and guidelines are in Dutch:

  • Handbook combination with other activities,
  • Handbook pilots,
  • Handbook for water friendly gardens,
  • Handbook living gardens,
  • Handbook climate proof children’s farms,
  • Guideline spatial adaptation,
  • Guideline water events,
  • Guideline integrated environmental visions,
  • Guideline local heat plan,
  • Guideline file foundations problems,
  • Toolbox Climate Proof Cities,
  • Guideline for rail infra (Prorail).

The Delta Programme Spatial Adaptation has published a guideline for standardized stress tests for heat, water logging, flooding and drought. This test has to be performed by all authorities in 2019.

International dimensions

Benelux

Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg work together in the Benelux for a long time. There are several working groups active, among other the Working Group on Climate Adaptation, the working group Disaster Risk Reductions and the working group Energy.

River Basins

There is a long history of cooperation between the countries of the rivers basins of the each of the four largest rivers flowing through the Netherlands: the Rhine, the Meuse, the Scheldt and the Ems. For each river basin there exists an international commission. Water quality, water quantity, flood protection and ecology are on the agenda of these Commission, giving international coordination between the member states to the implementation of the EU Water Framework Directive and the Flood Directive. The International Commission for the Protection of the Rhine (ICPR) is one of the oldest international river commissions in the world. Member states are the Netherlands, Germany, Luxembourg, France, Switzerland and the European Commission. The member states work closely together with Belgium, Austria, Liechtenstein and Italy to safeguard a good development of the river Rhine and its tributaries. The Conference of Rhine Ministers takes decisions in matters of political importance and establishes the basis for coherent, co-ordinated programmes of measure.

Wadden Sea

In the trilateral Wadden Sea cooperation Denmark, Germany and the Netherlands work together to protect the Wadden Sea as an ecological unity. The Wadden Sea Conference takes decisions in matters of political importance and establishes the basis for coherent, co-ordinated programmes of measure.

 

Ministry of Infrastructure and Water Management

DG Water Management and Soil

Willem Jan Goossen

Rijnstraat 8 NL-2515 XP The Hague The Netherlands

P.O. Box 20901 NL-2500 EX The Hague The Netherlands

Tel. +31 (0)70 456 00 00

Mail willem-jan.goossen@minienw.nl  

Website https://www.government.nl/ministries/ministry-of-infrastructure-and-water-management 

 

    [Disclaimer]
    The information presented in these pages is based on the reporting according to the Monitoring Mechanism Regulation (Regulation (EU) No 525/2013) and updates by the EEA member countries